5 Tips for Delegating Tasks at Work with Hesitancy

Delegating tasks can be a daunting prospect, especially if you’re someone who is a little bit of both hemishperic and Hesitant.

But delegating tasks at work isn’t only essential for your professional growth, it’s also one of the most impactful things you can do to free up your schedule, boost your productivity, and make your job more enjoyable.

Delegating tasks can be a huge help in making your job more rewarding, especially if you’re someone who finds tasks tedious, irksome, or even anxiety-provoking.

But if you’ve been reluctant to delegate tasks at work, you’re not alone—and there are several good reasons for it.

What’s stopping you from delegating tasks?

You’re afraid of criticism and having to take the reins

You don’t have enough trust in your team to give them control

You don’t know how to delegate tasks effectively

What can you do to overcome your hesitancy and delegates tasks?

  • You’re afraid of criticism and having to take the reins

One of the biggest fears many of us have when it comes to delegating tasks is that we’ll be criticised or judged harshly if things don’t go to plan. This can be a major roadblock if you’re trying to streamline your day to day tasks, particularly if you’re an introverted or an extrovert who’s self-conscious about it.

If you’re an extrovert and you’re worried you might not be able to take the heat when things don’t go to plan, you may want to seek out a career where your success is not only judged by the size of your paycheck but also the number of people you impress with your awesomeness.

You don’t have enough trust in your team to give them control

You might find that you don’t trust your team to take control of the delegated task and complete it to your satisfaction. This can be a problem if you’re working in an environment where people don’t trust each other to do their jobs effectively—in this case, you would have to take over to ensure the task was completed.

If you don’t have enough trust in your team, you’re better off taking over the task yourself to ensure it get’s done to your satisfaction.

  • You don’t know how to delegate tasks effectively

There’s a fine line between micromanaging and delegation and if you’re not careful, you could end up with a delegation that’s more hassle than it’s worth.

If you don’t know how to delegate tasks effectively, you might find that you spend more time managing the people who are responsible for the delegated task than you would have spent managing the original task itself.

To avoid this, you can conduct some research on the people who will be working on the delegated task and make sure you have a clear understanding of what their skill set is and what they’re capable of.

You can also speak to your manager about ways in which you could improve if you feel you’re not delegated tasks effectively.

What can you do to overcome your hesitancy and delegates tasks?

What are you trying to achieve by delegating tasks? Once you’ve identified your goals, you’ll be able to outline the specific tasks you need to be accomplished. This can help to reduce the amount of anxiety you feel when delegating tasks.

Set up a system.

Having a system in place can help to reduce the risk of you delegating a task and then having to take it back due to mistakes you’ve made.

You can set up a system in a variety of ways. You could create a document that outlines the tasks you need to be completed, list the jobs that need doing in your calendar, or create a job description that your team members can use when applying for a task.

  • Create a role-play scenario.

Role-playing can be a great way of preparing yourself for a task. This can help to reduce your anxiety, put you in a more Zen state of mind, and can also be a useful way of clarifying expectations with your team members.

  • Put it into the bigger picture.

Sometimes the only way to overcome your hesitancy towards delegating tasks is to put it into the bigger picture. Ask yourself, what’s one task that will make a significant difference to my team and my department?

Conclusion

Sharing Is Caring:

Leave a Comment